About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 8
MSNBCW 5
CSPAN2 3
CNNW 1
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
president obama was responsible for jeep jobs being sent over to china, something that never happened. here is part of it. let's listen. >> obama took gm and chrysler into bankruptcy and sold chrysler to italians who are going to build jeeps in china. mitt romney will fight for everyone american job. >> i'm mitt romney and i approved this message. >> of course, that's the jeep ad, michael crowley. sometimes these guys get caught in realtime, because the governor of this state and everybody said it didn't happen. >> right. well, chris, this is one of those wonderful examples where something can be factually accurate and still a complete lie. in other words, the language in that ad i believe stands up. that chrysler was going to begin, again, making jeeps in china, for chinese? >> right, right. it made perfect sense. a lot of auto companies do this. they weren't going to be moving jobs from the u.s. to china. but obviously that's the clear implication of the ad. so the fundamental message is a lie. they just covered themselves enough with the language. maybe they thought they wouldn't get cal
jeeps in china. >> that, of course, gets four pinocchios from the washington post. political pali "politics nation" gave it a pants on fire. let's hope we can play the game inside the lines from now on. we can all have our different opinions, but we can't have different facts. the truth is the truth. is the truth. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball starts" right now . >> severely conservative. let's play "hardball." >> good evening, i'm chris matthews down in washington. did you get the impression during the presidential campaign that the press was trying too hard to be even handed? did you think the people delivering the news were pushing what we call ambulanbalance at x expense of the obvious facts? the democrats in this election were like democrats going back to jack kennedy. but the republicans were far to the right as anything we've ever seen from that party, ever. self deportation, treat women like they belong in binders, ignore the rights of gay people, crack down on abortion rights, even in cases of rape. all the lingo in the gop platform approved in tampa, an
to help china, and china is the biggest abortion country in the world. when you throw all this into a big mixture, you cannot blame the gun. host: thank you for the call and comment. a bitter fight had on gun control, according to the washington post. we are following some of the options on what is next. speaker boehner is confronting a political cliff over the budget track is, putting out that the speaker's leadership and legacy remained at stake. they point out that in a show of support, house leader eric cantor. at a news conference with the speaker in a call to extend the tax rates. some have urged congressman tom price of georgia to challenge john deere for the job. much more on what is next for the fiscal cliff. one week before we reach that point. the deadline is december 31, january 1. the president is in hawaii. the house and senate are also in set -- in session this week. elliot engel, weighing in on a number of topics, including rumors that former republican senator chuck a bill could be nominated as defense secretary. you heard from the president on friday as he nominated sena
in germany or alabama. want them in lexington, kentucky or china? >> you mentioned germany. volkswagen opened a plant in chattanooga a few months ago, 2,000 new jobs. bob corcoran was down there. 2,000 jobs, every one of which started at $14.50 an hour. >> right. they're not all going to be at -- >> so volkswagen was moving these jobs here because we're the low wage country compared to germany. >> dude, are you suggesting we push these jobs away? >> i'm not. >> i would rather americans have a shot at a $17 an hour job than having it in china. >> i agree. >> find a way to do better. i actually agree with you. but you have to understand the consequences are pretty severe for american lifestyles. >> again, though, i'm sorry, mike, but the consequences are, we have two choices, we can't get 1965 wages, we either have these jobs in china or lexington, either have them in alabama or germany and this is at least for some of -- a chance for younger americans to get some good jobs. >> joe, if you're taking a job that pays $14.50 an hour. it means one of two things, a, you don't have a job so you're ge
the treaty including china and russia. the treaty is modelled after existing u.s. law. former senator bob dole is 89 years old. he just got out of the hospital yesterday. and today he came to the senate floor in a wheelchair to support the treaty. eight republicans and two independents voted for the treaty including john mccain. but it wasn't enough. the treaty failed 61-38. >> it was solid then. he means it. and i think the organizing around it is so important. the labor movement, consumer groups, women's groups. >> i'm joined by a columnist for the nation magazine and howard fineman, msnbc political analyst. great to have you with us. howard, you first. when bob dole comes to the senate and he can't move people, where is the common sense? >> the senate is lost. that's the way i would put it. bob dole, one of the most revered figures. he's almost literally on his death bed a week or two ago. who summoned the courage to come to the senate to be the conscious on something he championed in 1990. this was senator bob dole, a republican. president george h. bush, republican. dick thorneberg,
tried to take advantage of it. >> to follow up, i had the advantage of traveling to china with my parents when i was a freshman in college. chairman maou was the chairman of china then. that is how long ago it was. and i got to meet him. my dad used to tell the story of, you know, we were walking through the receiving line, and you did not know when you are going to meet the chairman. it was one of those things that, all of the sudden there would come up to you is that we need to get in the car right now. they did not tell you where you're going. dr. kissinger was with us. dr. kissinger would say, ok, we're obviously going to the palace and we're going to meet the chairman at the time. the picture i have is his eyes light up, he was known to like women.thi this picture i have is it is this man has risen from the dead. he was glad to see this tall, blond woman in china. >> did you have secret service code names? >> yes, mine was panda. it was all "p's." one brother was professor. i can remember what the others were. >> we were "l's." -- we were "v's." i was venus -- i am teasing, i
. they would just use other weapons, like they have in china, where they go in the classrooms and used swords and knives and start killing people? . that would probably be a bad idea too. so i think it's just education and trying to curb things that might influence people from doing such. host: what are some suggestions for that, jason? caller: it's hard to say, because a variety of people get into a variety of situations. whatever it is causes them to do things like that. better time spent talking to your kids, more money spent on mental health, things of that nature, i would say. otherwise, you are just point to end up with these situations occurring again. host: here's a story from cnn's talking about this recent attack where a man wielding a knife entered a school. injured 22 children and adults was also wounded. some of those kids are in critical condition. no deaths. does that make a difference to you? caller: certainly. i really don't know what you can do in a situation like that. if you look at gun-control laws such as in phoenix, arizona, where they have certain laws, it has not gone
to pay toward china and the middle east will not let him. there was a successful sabotaging program against iran's nuclear program and a ery new approach of iran's central bank and other institutions that continues to enrich uranium. is kind of're seeing the twilight of america's cold war imperium in the middle east. the u.s. will have a relationship with the new egypt but it will not be the relationship of a client state that we saw with's the minority -- hosni mubarak or on war said sadat. is the changing relationship in the country like pakistan after the osama bin laden raid and in states like yemen. they look over the horizon that bahrain and say, we do not want that. host: one of the papers this morning has a story taking a look at the change in leadership in specific countries in asia and highlighting what is going on in north korea, south korea, and japan. what does that prove for the administration? guest: you can put north korea in the same category as japan and south korea. they have taken power and have produced leaders but are still checked by the open society and by th
china because the dollar will not be worth. that is what is it is a bout. host: on the front page of "the financial times." we also have a tweet. this is what the senate minority leader said yesterday on the floor after his meeting at the white house. [video clip] >> i share the view of the majority leader. we had a good meeting at the white house. we are engaged in discussions, the majority leader and myself a in the hopes that we can come forward as early as sunday and have a recommendation that i can make to my conference and the majority leader can make to his conference. we will be working hard to try to see if we can get there in the next 24 hours. i am hopeful and optimistic. >> we are talking about the senate negotiating a fiscal could deal on -- but one of the stories of in the paper comes from the baltimore sun with the president of in there headline saying the president modestly optimistic. let's see what the thoughts are of the viewers and listeners this morning. pamela from new jersey on the line for democrats. are you optimistic about the fiscal clefts deal? caller:
, close to china, or is it just for the 50 states. guest: a really good question they apply to of the federated territories as well and for some of the grant programs there are statutory minimum amounts that have to be provided for the different territories. join the conversation and talked to david maurer about a homeland security grants to states, here are the numbers to call. what formula did the grant programs follow went looking to get out the money? what do they have to do? guest: it varies from program to program, but generally speaking, as a first cut, dhs takes into consideration the risk. in other words, it wants to provide the money more toward portions of the country where there is a greater risk of attack or natural disaster. secondly, we look at capabilities. how capable are the state and local governments already. those that are less capable should get additional funding. and third, they look of the types of project that they are applying for. one of the interesting thing about the third step isthe state and local governments do not apply untypically for speci
and china. john fund, coauthor of the book "who's counting." you want a raise? you want a clerical worker? the money is pretty good. $87,000 a year. $105,000 with a compensation package. one of the top u.s. blue collar jobs. >> the outrageous thing about this strike is this. the port owners were willing to say all the clerks will have lifetime employment. but if someone retires we want the flexibility to move their job around or eliminate their position and the union said no. these clerks basically still use paper invoices to make sure the cargo moves clearly. a lot of that can be automated. these jobs, $165,000 are apparently forever. as a result of that we had this unnecessary strike and it cost a billion dollars a day and the price of toys may go up on christmas. >> this was not about benefits, vacation or pensions or salary. it was about the job of these clerks monitoring the port car go and their jobs are going to be guaranteed for life. but they wouldn't be allowed to replace them or eliminate those jobs once they retired. bill: so the debate was about what happens in the future. if
was packing up jobs and shipping them off to china. not the case. >> bill: got caught with that lie. >> the very last batch of twinkies from the shuddered hostess company has gone on sale. it is now basically gone. super value grocery chain in chicago made the final purchase from hostess. they got an order of 20,000 twinkies. they went on sale monday at 150 different stores. pretty much all gone by yesterday. >> bill: oh, my god. how about that. you don't think they ate them. >> save them. >> they'll stay good for awhile. >> bill: sell them on ebay. yes, i have to tell you department of labor last night holiday party. hosted by secretary of labor hilda soliz and i talked to a couple of international labor presidents there lee saunders from afscme, joseph nigro from the sheet metalworkers. president jim hoffa from the teamsters was here on the program with us on monday. all of them said of course they're outraged by what happened in michigan. michigan just forcing through the republicans in the legislature, fo
are not making them here in this country, we know where they are going to be made? >> right. >> china or sweeden or someplace else. >> hopefully we make them here and they become -- we become more energy independent. >> every time during campaign, i must tell you -- peter, we talked about this on the air, romney saying and he spent $95 million$95,000,000 or a billion dollars on renew alan energy. i kept wondering if he would say you are damn right i did. >> there were a lot of jobs created. >> exactly? >> not only in places like california. you and i know that, around the country and florida and in maine and boston where you see individual state leaders taking it uponthems to make these investments as well but that has to continue. we have to be at the forefront of that. >> and as we go as californians californians, we have to to say what happened in michigan is deplorable, what happened in california where there was an initiative and the labor unions got the together and we were able to fight back and defeat that initiative in california. the fight goes o
met him when he worked with haley bailey 18 years ago in china. he was a great divan. he's a great guy now. i hope you're good to meet him. it hadn't been for him, we wouldn't be here tonight. so, and jackie, wherever she is. they are. without her the invitation list would have been a mess. i have no alan simpson for just over 40 years. i heard of the story sophisticated than i try to do them myself. and he helped me out of that hole. i worked 18 years. as press secretary in chief chief of staff responsible for all mistakes. [laughter] wayne al went to retire and went to harvard, i went to the smithsonian and was in charge of government for a wild man. my wonderful wife, rebecca who is right here. i'm telling you i could not have done this book without you. she did with research and out of me being up at 4:00 in the morning and she is amazing. so we went overseas and did a bunch of work with charities and children and blind people and lepers and came back and ended up on a sailboat in one day in 2005, the phone connected for some reason to some island power in your brain and it was all
the work with glen bailey and holly page. i met him 18 years ago in china. a great guy then to migrate dynel. if it hadn't been for him we would not be here tonight. so jackie, wherever she is. no, there. without heard the invitation list would have been a mess. i have known allen and simpson for just over 50 years. i grew up in wyoming. i heard all the stories and i was a kid and then i tried to do them myself. he helped me out of that. i worked 18 years. press secretary in the chief of staff, responsible for all mistakes. [laughter] when he went to retire and went harvard, i went to the smithsonian and those in charge of government. my wonderful wife, rebecca, who was right here, i'm telling you, i could not have been without her. she researched and put up the media before:00 in the morning and is amazing. so we were tired, when overseas and did a bunch of work for charities and children and blind people on the purse and came back and ended up on a sailboat. one day in 2005 the phone connected to some island to our. it rained. it was al simpson. he said, these guys want to write the
the russian point of view was that gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. and with 100 inf missiles directed at him, how was he going to do that? it's really not in their interest to have 100 missiles out of europe. and it was really in their interest. now, we now have access, have for some years, records of the polit bureau discussions. and let me go back to a couple words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev, he wrote out on a yellow pad several pages, without any prompting from anybody, what he wanted to achieve in geneva in his first meeting. this was handed literally to me as we are getting off the plane in geneva, saying this is what the president has on his mind. if he is wrong somewhere, we will have to straighten him out. actually, it was a very, very precise paper. and among other things, he pointed out that our biggest problems, one of these was a lack of trust. that he had to find a way to begin to create trust. we're not going to solve anything else. he also had it, if i don't achieve anything else, i must convince gorbachev t
at this hour's hot shots. wisconsin, a cnn ireporter takes a picture of snow-covered trees. >>> in china, christmas tr ornaments are on display. in florida, packages are shipped on what they expect to be the busiest day of the year. and in japan, monkeys cuddle together in the snow. hot shots, pictures from around the world. >> those monkeys in japan, not the only monkeys in the news today. jeanne moos has proof that nothing perks up a hum drum shopping day like a monkey in a fancy coat. >> you go to ikea expecting cheap furniture. >> this is so bizarre. why is there a monkey at ikea. >> there he was running around in an outfit that freaked everyone out. >> it's faux fur, not a shearli shearling. >> double breasted, no less. the tweets started to fly. anyone lose their monkey at ikea? actually, yeah. the owner was shopping inside the store when monkey managed to get out of his crate and then out of the car. >> all the people were trying to, like, call it towards them, but it was very scared. it was darting all over the place. they were trying to get it away from cars. >> his diaper only
going to compete with china with 1.3 billion people? the answer is we can have the entire world at our disposal by creating conditions that the best people in the wormed can come to the united states and study. >> and stay and start businesses. >> two, then we have to focus on faction, particularly the corporate tax reform, to get a system which is simpler and promotes efficiency and makes it easier for businesses to compete if the world. third, then we have to -- that will create -- that will be enormous. third, then there is a infrastructure investment that needs to be made. this is very important because in the context of the kiped of budget deal we'll get where we'll spend less going forward as businesses, we have to think about what our values are with respect to what we'll spend money on. the most important things we can spend money on is infrastructure to again create -- make investments in the future rather than just short-term spending. and then twin that with important support for research, basic research, and for higher education as drew talked about. and for education. thos
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)